Why Managed Detection and Response is a Valuable Tool for Small to Medium Businesses

Managed Detection

Managed Detection and Response could be the solution businesses are looking for in a world where cybercrime is on the rise and security experts are hard to find.  

Managed Detection

Cybersecurity is becoming much more than just a buzz word as cyberattacks on businesses increase and companies face the challenge of finding skilled cybersecurity professionals. By 2022, there could potentially be as many as 1.8 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs, a pain point for many small to medium businesses.

While cybercrime continues to threaten these very businesses, many are wondering if there is a solution to these challenges. How does a company protect significant amounts of data with limited IT and security staff? The answer comes in the form of specialized teams of security and threat analysts, or Managed Detection and Response.

Managed Detection and Response (MDR)

Similar to other Managed Service Providers, companies that specialize in MDR work to provide cybersecurity support to companies that are either lacking skills or time to manage security. What makes Managed Detection and Response unique is its comprehensive approach to dealing with threats.

MDR requires both technology and human analysis to effectively and proactively detect, remediate, and eventually eliminate cyber threats. Where other providers offer an overall software and hardware-based alert system, they are often limited in their ability to respond to, research, and diagnose the number of alerts that happen daily.

With managed detection and response, analysts sift through alerts to determine if they require action. When a response is required, they offer immediate support in resolving the issue and determining its source so that a threat of that type is less likely to occur again.

MDR also takes a proactive approach to threat detection—also called threat hunting—that helps companies determine the overall state of their cybersecurity measures. Specialized analysts are able to research why or how a threat is occurring, resulting in a more comprehensive solution. This same skill set allows them to see beyond the individual incident and understand the greater need behind your network, server, and endpoint data protection.

Improving Your Cybersecurity Defenses

While cyberattacks on big companies dominate the news headlines, it is small to medium businesses that are facing the majority of threats—and they are doing it unprepared. At least 43% of cyberattacks are directed at small businesses, but very few are prepared to deal with the onslaught. On average, these attacks cost businesses $200,000, which is more than many of them can handle.

Managed Security Services provide necessary firewall and perimeter protection for your network, and prove to be helpful in providing alerts when anomalies arise. But the amount of protection most companies need can only come in the form of a specialized and highly trained in-house security team or an MDR.

As cybercrime continues to increase, protecting more than just your company’s network perimeter will be key to improving your cybersecurity defenses. Finding and outsourcing your security needs to Managed Detection and Response could be the best way forward in a world where cybersecurity is an essential part of your company’s future.

How to Hire Qualified Computer Specialists

Computer Repair

Need to Hire a Computer Repair Specialist? 5 Criteria to Consider

Are You Ready to Hire a Computer Repair Specialist? Read about the 5 Criteria You Need to Evaluate to Avoid Hiring the Wrong Person and Costly Mistakes  

Computer Repair

Computer use in the U.S. has grown exponentially in the last decade. Over 15 million computer devices were shipped out to users per year in 2003, according to industry data. That amount rose to an astonishing 65 million per quarter in 2015. With that many devices in consumers’ hands, computer repair specialists are a must for personal and enterprise users when something goes wrong. However, when it comes time to decide who to hire, knowing what criteria to look for can mean the difference between a mediocre and an excellent result.

Experience Levels

When deciding to hire a computer repair specialist or vendor, ask about the length and type of experience the specialist has. A specialist that has years of experience with the types of devices your organization has is ideal. If hiring a specialist from a local or national vendor, ask how employees or contractors are selected. Some vendors, for example, will only hire contractors that have successfully completed various industry certifications.

Education and Training

Hiring specialists that possess a formal degree in computer science or information systems can help improve the quality of service you receive. Industry certifications specific to general computer repair and troubleshooting, Apple, and Microsoft devices can also help. Specialists that keep up to date with industry trends and changes through continuing education courses is another good sign you will receive excellent service. Yet, industry certifications and degrees alone are not as important as years on the job and skills.

Device Types

Take a look at what types of devices your organization has and what devices require ongoing or periodic support. Some repair technicians will be highly specialized in certain types of devices, such as tablets or desktops. Repair specialists may only work on specific brands like Apple or Dell. Another important consideration is determining which repairs and devices can be supported internally versus externally. Simple repairs like replacing or upgrading RAM might be able to be completed by your internal IT department, depending upon the device brand and type. Other repairs like replacing a motherboard could be more complicated and require the device to be shipped into a vendor’s depot or replaced with a similar unit.

Cost

The cost of hiring a qualified computer repair specialist is usually at the top of most organizations’ criteria. Although it can be tempting to choose the vendor or specialist that offers the lowest price, this may not always be the best option. Consider whether there will be extra fees for issues that come up after the initial repair is completed. Also, check into whether completed repairs come with a warranty and how long the warranty lasts. Keep in mind that while the price of the service is not necessarily equated with quality, choosing smaller vendors or individual repair specialists will likely provide you with the best value.

Recommendations

Ask peers for recommendations on qualified computer repair providers. If the vendor or specialist is local, visit the location as a potential customer to see how the specialist responds. Assess whether you were treated courteously, whether the technician attempted to listen to your problem, and what repairs the technician recommended.

4 Dangers of Hiring Printer Companies to Manage Your IT Services

Printer Repair Companies

4 Reasons Not to Hire Printer Companies

Thinking about saving money on your IT services with a printer company? Learn about the pitfalls and dangers of relying on support from companies without expertise.  

Printer Repair Companies

Hiring a printer company to take care of your IT services can seem like a great solution. You won’t have to consult with multiple vendors or negotiate multiple contracts. A printer company might even offer to take care of all of your IT services for less than what you’re currently spending. However, there are several reasons why you should not trust a printer company as your single vendor for all of your organization’s IT needs. Although you may pay less, that lower price comes with a higher cost – substandard service and support.

The delivery of substandard service and support from printer companies occurs due to the following:

  • A lack of experience
  • An inability to understand the true nature and components of IT services
  • Inadequate resources directed towards developing IT and IT services
  • Unstable organizations due to conflicts between printing and IT services

Insufficient Experience

By design, printer companies are specialists in troubleshooting and maintaining two items – printers and copiers. While these companies are experts at providing service on these types of devices, branching out into the world of IT services is not something these companies have done in the past. Even though the staff may have basic troubleshooting, sales, and customer service experience under their belts, they may only have limited experience with the complexities of managing networks.

Lack of Understanding

Since printer companies do not have decades of experience with IT services, there is often a skill and knowledge gap. Without an understanding of and experience with more complex computing devices, troubleshooting skills may be limited. Computing devices, servers, and network equipment are more intricate than printers or copiers. In order to configure, deploy, maintain, troubleshoot, and fix this type of equipment, advanced and interdependent knowledge is necessary. It is far easier for printer companies to overlook the source of a problem with network dependent devices and the network itself simply due to a lack of skill.

Inadequate Resources

Since these companies specialize in printers and copiers, it is more difficult to devote internal resources to IT services. This means that there may be little put into research and development, training staff on the skills they need to support IT services, and a lack of support staff designated to managing IT services for clients. In other words, printer companies tend to overpromise and underdeliver when it comes to supporting services and devices outside of printers.

Instability

When printer companies try to branch out into IT services, it can cause internal conflict. Staff that is managing printers and copiers may not be able to keep the company afloat, due to the fact that the company is not reinvesting what it should into its printer expertise. Consequently, both sides of the business begin to suffer, and animosity develops. Leaders within the company may decide to cut out IT services altogether, leaving clients without support.

Downtime Is Extremely Expensive – Can You Actually Afford It?

Computer Network Downtime

Downtime is bad for business.

Whether you agree or not, it’s a fact – just a couple years ago, small businesses with up to 50 million in annual revenue reported that just a single hour of downtime cost them $8,600.

Computer Network Downtime

Why Does Downtime Cost So Much?

The main cost of downtime is not the fix itself, it’s the halt in your business’ productivity. If an IT-related or natural disaster occurs and takes critical systems offline, employees will be unable to complete their tasks, yet your normal business expenses will carry on.

During that time, you incur all the expenses of running a business without the revenue you would usually generate. Even if downtime does not grind everything to a halt, some of your staff will have to divert themselves from their normal work to mitigate the problem – again reducing productivity. Furthermore, while your systems are down, you can’t deliver services or sell products to current and potential new clients.

Not all of the costs associated with downtime have a tangible price tag. The trust of your clients and the reputation of your company are invaluable assets that can erode with prolonged or frequent downtime issues. A diminished reputation can negatively affect your future business opportunities.

Some downtime is inevitable, but much of it can be prevented and mitigated.

What Are The Primary Causes Of Downtime?

  • Power Outage: If your power source fails, that can lead to a long list of complications like servers going down and lost, unsaved data.
  • Cybercrime: Cybercrime has increased in recent years and is still on the rise. All it takes is one employee opening a malicious attachment and your business data could be held hostage.
  • Human Error: Accidentally unplugging key equipment, overloading the system, and improper installations can all cause downtime, but maintaining certain policies and procedures can cut down on human error.
  • Natural Disasters: Hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and earthquakes happen. Having a plan for getting back to business if the unthinkable happens is the fastest way to recover.

What’s The Best Way To Prevent Downtime?

…by stopping it in the first place.

The best way to approach downtime prevention is proactively – you need to keep an eye out for system issues that can spiral into total stoppages. You need to implement backup technologies and best practices to prevent outages. You need to enhance your cybersecurity to protect against cybercrime.

Unfortunately, that’s a lot for you to handle on your own, especially when have other work to see to. That’s why a managed IT services company can be so helpful. They’ll provide 24/7 active monitoring of your systems, business continuity best practices and cybersecurity services that will keep costly downtime at a minimum.

 

Communicate Consistently With Customers About Their Technology Needs and Your Value

MSP Customer Communication Leads to Deeper Long-Term Retention

Discover why it’s important that your managed services provider develops a regular communications schedule with each customer and what messages to convey.

MSP Communication

Managed services providers (MSPs) know that customer retention is a critical element of business success.

Communicating with your MSP customers is a must. But knowing how, when and what to communicate makes a difference.

How Frequently Should We Communicate with MSP Customers?

The frequency of communication is as much an art as it is a science. There may be some customers, especially those who are new, in the midst of a major project or in the throes of strategic planning, when more frequent contact and communication is necessary.

Face-to-face communication is the most effective means of communication, allowing for both a better give-and-take and a clearer interpretation of body language.

Ideally, you’ll schedule at least monthly in-person communication with your customers, meeting both with principals and other employees to understand what’s working and what could be improved. This communication, which includes a healthy dose of active listening, helps your customers feel heard, valued and respected, even if it’s an informal conversation over coffee and doughnuts.

What Brings Value to MSP Customer Communications?

Your customers look to you as more than a service provider. You’re also a valued advisor. You want your communications to have several elements that can bring value to your customers and how they perceive their relationship with you. These do not need to be a sales pitch, and usually should not be, but rather opportunities to demonstrate your expertise and insights, including:

  • Identifying solutions before you’re asked. If your client has, for example, recently had several cyberattack attempts that were the result of phishing attempts, you may want to suggest a heightened approach to employee education, including campaigns that test their responses to sample attack emails.
  • Looking forward. You want to provide insights on technology trends, emerging solutions and challenges, whether it’s a new version of software, regulatory changes affecting their business or the sunsetting of an operating system. Providing information that helps the customer consider the possibilities is a compelling way to demonstrate your value. These conversations can often unearth concerns and priorities that previously were not expressed.
  • Find synergies and partners. Look for connections and introductions you can make among your customers. You can also identify opportunities for partnerships or bartering opportunities, such as working with a printing company client to produce signage and business cards in exchange for a discount on provided IT services.

Value-added conversations that help your customers think in new ways are a powerful way of deepening customer relationships.

What Points Are Worth Repeating to MSP Customers?

One of the greatest outcomes of better customer communication is the opportunity to reinforce high-value and valuable services that are already being used or possible. Your communication should regularly reinforce some of the core values of working with a managed services provider. Driving these points home helps to make renewals, upgrades and the purchase of new services much easier.

Those key points are small reminders of why it makes sense for your customers to work with you, including:

  • Cost savings. Produce and walk your customers through how their managed services are reducing costs through improved efficiency, fewer downtime costs, lower operational costs for data centers and reduced internal IT staffing
  • Predictable costs. Customers need to be reminded that a fixed monthly cost for a range of IT services — help desk, vendor management, storage, disaster recovery, cloud hosting and security — means more budget certainty and fewer unanticipated technology expenses.
  • Less downtime. MSPs should tout their reliability and the high levels of uptime for services and systems. While these may be contractually mandated, it’s still an effective reminder of how committed your company is to their business operability levels.
  • Insurance. People and businesses purchase insurance to protect what matters most. That’s one way to frame managed services: insurance for your most critical systems, operations, processes and data.

A strategic approach to customer communications pays major dividends with regular, trusted and valued discussions.

Can I Use Windows 7 After January 14, 2020 or Do I Have to Upgrade to Windows 10?

Windows 10 Upgrade Questions

Can I Use Windows 7 After January 14, 2020 or Do I Have to Upgrade to Windows 10?

If you’re still running Microsoft’s Windows 7 on your computer, maybe it’s time to upgrade to Windows 10. After January 14, 2020, Windows 7 won’t be supported.  

Windows 10 Upgrade Questions

If you are using Windows 7 on your computer, you need to be aware that after January 14, 2020, Microsoft won’t release any additional updates or support for Windows 7. Even though Windows 10 has been available for about four years, Windows 7 (which was originally released on October 22, 2009), is still running on millions of computers worldwide. Since all of the Windows 7 support will end on the deadline of January 14, Windows 7 OS has been displaying ”end of support” notifications. If you’re receiving these notifications, that means your computer is still running Windows 7. Many current Windows 7 users wonder if they can still use Windows after January 14, and what will happen to Windows 7 after that date. To help decide what to do, here is a list of FAQs and answers.

Can I still use Windows 7 after January 14, 2020?

Yes, you can continue using Windows 7 after January 14, 2020. Windows 7 will continue to run as it is today. However, you should upgrade to Windows 10 before January 14, 2020, because Microsoft will be discontinuing all technical support, software updates, security updates, and any other fixes after that date. Your computer will become less secure without any updates the longer you go without them.

What will happen to Windows 7 after January 14, 2020?

Nothing will happen to Windows 7. But one of the problems that will happen is, without regular updates, Windows 7 will become vulnerable to security risks, viruses, hacking, and malware without any support. You may continue to get “end of support” notifications on your Windows 7 home screen after January 14. However, anyone still running Windows 7 Professional and/or Enterprise editions can purchase extended security updates through January 2023.

Can I reinstall and activate Windows 7 after 2020?

Yes. You should be able to install or reinstall, then activate Windows 7 after January 14, 2020. However, you won’t get any updates via Windows Update, and Microsoft will no longer offer any kind of support to Windows 7.

Can I upgrade Windows 7 to Windows 10 without losing programs and data?

Most programs and data should be transferrable to Windows 10, but you should back up your computer or network before you upgrade in case any problems crop up.

Does my current PC’s hardware support Windows 10?

If your computer is running Windows 7, it should be able to run Windows 10. In other words, the minimum requirement for both Windows 7 and Windows 10 are the same. It’s recommended that you use the official Media Creation Tool to upgrade, because it will scan your computer for any compatibility issues before you upgrade.

Is Windows 10 better than Windows 7?

Yes. Windows 10 is a better operating system than Windows 7. And, Windows 7 is 10 years old, and can’t give your computer the security level needed now.

Can I try Windows 10 before buying it?

Yes. You can follow the instructions to download the Windows ISO file guide to the most recent version of Windows 10. It will tell you how to prepare a bootable USB of Windows 10, and then you can install in alongside Windows 10 to try it out.

How do I upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10?

The process of upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10 is easy to follow when you go through the steps outlined for the official Media Creation Tool. And most importantly, backup your computer BEFORE you download Windows 10.

MSP Vs. In-House: The Pros and Cons

Managed Service Providers

What Are the Pros and Cons of an MSP Vs. In-House IT Services?

Many businesses struggle with how to choose an IT services team. Should you hire in-house or go with an MSP? Learn the pros and cons of each option here.

Managed Service Providers

When it comes to IT services — from daily maintenance and cybersecurity, to new installations and troubleshooting — which is better: Hiring an outside managed services provider (MSP) or employing an in-house IT specialist or team?

This question is not a new one. It’s dealt with in many other arenas where outsourcing a specific task is possible — for example: Marketing, bookkeeping, janitorial services, catering, etc.

Part of making a final decision on matters like these is weighing the pros and cons. If your business is considering the hire of an MSP versus the hire of an in-house IT specialist (or team of specialists), consider the following pros and cons to each option below.

In-House IT: Pros and Cons

Pro: On-site availability

Many businesses like having an in-house IT support person (or a team) because it gives them continual, on-site access to IT help when they need it. Of course, this only extends to business hours.

Pro: Possible deeper knowledge of your company’s internal infrastructure

In-house IT service professionals will generally know the ins and outs of your particular business better than outsourced IT services.

Con: High personnel costs

In-house IT teams should be paid a living wage, which often includes perks such as healthcare services and paid vacation and sick leave.

Con: Lack of support if IT specialist is on vacation or sick

Speaking of paid vacation and sick leave, during those times when your IT staff is away, you’ll have no access to IT services, which could put your business efficiency at risk.

Con: Lots of downtimes

On the other hand, when you don’t require the services of your IT team, you’ll still have to pay them, resulting in a continual outflow of money that’s not actually serving your business.

Con: Lower level of expertise

Of course, this all depends on the IT team you’d hire, but it’s generally accepted that most SMBs won’t be able to support continual training for their in-house IT team. Unfortunately, in the IT support world, continual training is absolutely vital.

Managed Services Provider (MSP): Pros and Cons

Pro: Range of payment options

From the get-go, businesses can choose their level of service when it comes to MSPs. If you’re small and just starting out, you can choose a service level that matches your budgets and your needs.

Pro: Scalability

As your business grows, MSPs allow you to scale up to higher levels of service. That way, you’ll actually be paying for the services you use instead of an unchangeable flat rate, no matter how many services you employ.

Pro: Broader skill base

MSPs specialize in IT services — it’s their bread and butter. As a result, they have a vested interest in staying up-to-date with the most advanced IT service practices available at any given time. They are continually learning, training, and expanding their knowledge and capabilities.

Pro: 24/7 availability

Although it’s true that in-house IT services are always available on-site, MSPs offer 24/7 service — you just have to give them a call. In fact, most MSPs will give you a “minimum response time.” That’s the maximum number of minutes you’ll have to wait if you need their services any time of the day or night, 24/7. It’s generally around 10 minutes to an hour at most.

Con: Lack of full control over IT systems

The biggest con of MSPs is that they’re outsourced. That is, they’re located remotely, and as a result, they’re not on-premise wherever you are. In some cases, this could possibly result in less control over IT on your end.

At the same time, however, it’s important to note that many businesses aren’t interested in this control. They simply need reliable IT services to fix problems, provide security, and occasionally install new hardware or software.

MSPs: The Right Choice for Your Business

The scalability, low-cost, provided expertise and a wide array of support offered by managed services providers make them the best choice for nearly all businesses.

From small startups with low budgets to large enterprises that need top-of-the-line security from the best in the business, IT services that are handled by MSPs consistently rate higher and provide more satisfaction to their clients.

If your business is looking to hire a managed services provider, do your research. You’ll want to find a local MSP with expertise in your company’s particular industry. Finally, look for adequate training and certifications in employees and reputable history of satisfied clients.

Top Reasons to Jumpstart Your Business’s Paperless Initiative

Paperless Society

Jumpstart Your Business’s Paperless Initiative

Want to “go paperless” with your company? See the many benefits of paperless business and learn how to jumpstart this initiative for effective results.  

Paperless Society

Many businesses toy around with the idea of “going paperless,” but what’s actually in it for the companies who decide to go through with it?

To be sure, not all businesses are cut out to go paperless. Certain documents in certain industries simply must be in paper form. Therefore, depending on your industry and unique company needs, you may end up unnecessarily complicating affairs if you try to do everything digitally.

At the same time, a great many companies will benefit significantly from making this change. Below, we’ll go over the specific reasons why it might be a good idea for your company. First, though, let’s define what going paperless actually means.

What Does It Really Mean to “Go Paperless”?

The term “going paperless” simply refers to the shift from printed documents to digital documents. For example, instead of printing invoices, order forms, and tax documents, a company would issue all of these documents digitally, sending them via email or storing them as files.

What Are the Top Reasons to “Go Paperless”?

You’ll save money.

Cloud data storage is a lot less expensive than on-premise data storage. Moreover, on-premise data storage forces you to pay for the maximum amount of storage you may need upfront. With cloud storage, you can easily scale your storage capacity up or down, depending on your needs.

In addition, the products and tools needed to print, scan, and copy your company’s documents is extremely expensive. Printers and copiers alone can cost thousands of dollars, and fixing and maintaining them is expensive as well. With a paperless system, these tools become obsolete. Of course, you’ll also save a bundle on paper and ink.

You’ll have document access from everywhere.

Most businesses who go paperless store their documents in the cloud. When you do this, access to these documents is available wherever you can find an Internet connection. This makes it easier to hire remote workers, send employees on work trips, and access important information even when you’re away from the office.

You’ll save time.

Consider the time it takes to print, scan, copy, collate, organize, and store all of your paper documents. Additionally, remember that when you have a huge number of documents to contend with, protocols and systems must be developed, instituted, and monitored. Lastly, think about how long it takes to find a specific document within your files.

All of these tasks are time-consuming, and in any business, time is money.

When you switch to a digital system of document storage, you’ll be saving an immense amount of time. Documents can be digitally created, copied, sent, edited, and stored. There’s no need to run to the printer or search through endless boxes for the paper file you need. When searching for files, you can simply pop a few keywords into the search bar of your data storage system, and voilà — it will appear!

You’ll save space.

Consider how much space you currently use to store paper documents. From old tax returns and invoices to printed data and memos, an accumulation of individual sheets of paper can actually take up quite a lot of room.

Digital documents, on the other hand, are virtually invisible. As long as you have enough data storage capacity available, you’ll gain tons of physical space when you make the switch to a paperless system.

You’ll ensure better security of your data

While it’s possible for cloud-stored data to be compromised, it’s much more likely that sensitive files will be stolen or accidentally destroyed in paper form. This may happen as the result of a crime or simply because of a flood, fire, or another natural disaster.

Online data, on the other hand, can be encrypted. With the right security team on your side, you can apply layered security systems to your cloud storage protocol in order to better protect your data.

What Are Some Tips for Jumpstarting Your Business’s Paperless Initiative?

When going paperless, use the following tips to make the transition easier and smoother.

1. Start with a plan.

All paperless initiatives should begin with a plan. Sit down with your management team, and create a day-by-day, week-by-week schedule for setting up whatever paperless system you choose.

2. Go slow.

Before springing a new system on your employees, it’s essential that you predict all possible complications. You’ll also want to anticipate how going paperless will affect your employees, clients, and customers, and warn them of the changes that will be made.

3. Get help.

Lastly, don’t forget to seek professional help with the technology aspect of your new paperless system. A managed service provider can help you set up a secure, easy-to-use cloud storage system and offer extremely useful assistance for making the overall transition.

To Lease or Buy a Copier?

Copier Sales and Lease

Should You Buy a Copier or Lease It?

Trying to decide whether to lease a copier or buy a copier? Find out the pros and cons. See when buying or leasing may be the best option for your business.  

Copier Sales and Lease

No single piece of equipment in the office takes more of a beating than the floor-standing copier.

Day in and day out it endures transitions between high heat and frigid office temps, paper jam tug-of-war, lid slamming and endless pieces of paper traveling at lightning speed across its rollers. All of this demanding work takes a toll on the device, giving it an average lifespan of just five years in a busy office.

Eventually, you’ll find yourself needing to find a replacement and the question arises: should you lease or buy a copier? There’s no one-size-fits-all answer to that question. These pros and cons will help you make the right choice for you and your business.

Why Buy a Copier?

When you’re playing the long game, buying a copier is usually the less expensive option–when it comes to the cost of the copier. You’ll avoid finance charges and other fees. You’ll also avoid a hard credit check, which may impact your credit score. If you’re a smaller or growing business, you like to keep your credit as clean as possible.

And even if you did have to put it on credit, the printer is yours after you finish paying for it. Some high-quality floor copiers can last up to 10 years, especially if you’re not a high-volume office. So that may be a very good deal.

Okay. So it sounds like buying is the way to go. But wait! There are some cons to consider.

When Buying a Copier Isn’t Your Best Option

Since the dawn of time, technology has never stood still. And the rate of change is only getting faster. A bought printer may have everything you need today. But no one really knows what businesses may need in 10 years. That could put you at a competitive disadvantage against newer companies in the future with the latest technology.

If you needed to resell that printer because you weren’t using it like you thought or needed to free up cash, you might recoup 50% if you sold it immediately, but in 5 years, it would probably cost more for someone to move it than they’d pay for the copier.

Not unlike a car, it’s not going to hold its value.

If your rainy day fund is tapped out and you’d have to put buying a copier on credit, interest charges may make the copier cost a lot more than you think you’re saving by buying over leasing a copier.

Finally, an aging printer will also begin to require more maintenance to keep it running smoothly. And you might find yourself feeling like you have to keep it past its prime to get your money’s worth. That may cost you in employee productivity and lost wages.

Why Lease a Copier?

Leasing a copier does make sense if you need to have clear terms from month-to-month. You know upfront how much you pay each month and for how long. That’s often easier on the budget. If cash flow is tight and you’d have to finance a bought printer anyway, leasing may actually end up saving you money.

When your term ends, you’re not stuck with a printer that may now be outdated or breaking down. You can upgrade when you renew your lease. Or, depending on the lease terms, you may be able to buy the copier at the end of the lease for a minimal cost if it’s still working for you.

A newer copier needs less maintenance and functions more efficiently, increasing workplace productivity and reducing worker frustration around inadequate technology. If the leased copier needs maintenance or stops working entirely, that’s likely the responsibility of the leasing company.

That’s not an emergency expense you have to worry about.

When Leasing a Copier Isn’t Your Best Option

You will pay more for the leased copier than you otherwise would. Those pros of leasing listed above come at a price. It’s important to realize that those are what you’re paying for, not just the copier. In a way leasing is another way to manage risk. Not unlike buying insurance, you’re paying the leasing company to take on what would otherwise be your risk.

Every business has a certain amount of risk they’re comfortable managing and planning for. Leasing a copier may not make sense for you if you’re in a position where you can effectively manage more risk. That copier may last you 15 years or five. You just don’t know because lifespan is so strongly affected by how your office uses it.

Ultimately, deciding whether to lease or buy a copier is a very company-specific decision. So weigh these pros and cons and you’ll make the right choice for your business.

Do You Know What to Do Now That Support for Windows 7 Is Ending?

Windows 7 End of Support

What to Do Now That Support for Windows 7 Is Ending

In just a few short months, support for Windows 7 will come to an end. Is your business ready?

If your business is currently operating Windows 7, it’s time to switch to Windows 10. Microsoft will be ending technical support for Windows 7 in January 2020.

 

An enormous number of businesses throughout the United States use Windows operating systems to run their companies. In fact, Windows famously runs the majority of the world’s entire population of computers — including those used in business and personal computers (PCs).

Each of these Windows computers has its own version of Windows’ operating system (OS). Right now, the most popular operating systems are Windows 7 and Windows 10. Windows 7 was originally released ten years ago in 2009, and Windows 10 was released in 2015.

Now, Microsoft is phasing out its support for Windows 7. According to the company, this was always the plan:

“Microsoft made a commitment to provide 10 years of product support for Windows 7 when it was released on October 22, 2009. When this 10-year period ends, Microsoft will discontinue Windows 7 support so that we can focus our investment on supporting newer technologies and great new experiences.”

So, when will this change take place?

According to the company, “The specific end of support day for Windows 7 will be January 14, 2020.”

They go on to say: “Microsoft strongly recommends that you move to Windows 10 sometime before January 2020 to avoid a situation where you need service or support that is no longer available.”

What Does the End of Windows 7 Support Mean for Your Business?

First off, it’s important to note that this change is definitely a big deal.

While the initial reaction of some companies and individuals may be that “end of support” doesn’t really matter, this assumption would be rather reckless. If you fail to update to Windows 10, Microsoft’s imminent cessation of support for Windows 7 has the possibility of causing your business huge problems. Specifically, the end of Windows 7 support means that Microsoft will no longer be providing any type of technical support and absolutely no software or security updates or fixes to this operating system.

As a result, if you run into a major technical problem with a computer running Windows 7 after the end-of-service date (January 14, 2020) or if your security is breached, you’ll get no assistance from Microsoft.

While this realization is shocking (and possibly rather annoying) for many, Microsoft has been warning users about the impending change for a long time. If you have Windows 7, you should have been receiving consistent advisories to this effect. Additionally, if you work with an IT service provider, they have likely been alerting you of the future change as well.

Security Issues With Microsoft 7 Moving Forward

One of the biggest reasons to update to Windows 10 is to ensure your company’s security in the face of possible cyberattacks.

When Microsoft says they’ll no longer be providing Windows 7 support, one of the things they’ll no longer be doing is providing security updates. Normally, Microsoft tracks security issues closely. When a specific cyberattack trend or weakness in their system becomes obvious, they release an update to fix the problem or better fend off would-be attackers.

On January 14, 2020, this will stop.

Unfortunately, cyber criminals are gleefully anticipating this date. They will take full advantage of the security gaps left in Windows 7 operating systems if they can. Those who fail to leave Windows 7 and move to Windows 10 will, of course, be the targets.

Have Questions About the Switch to Windows 10?

To be sure, Windows 10 promises to provide many useful updates and upgrades for Microsoft users. At the same time, the transition from Windows 7 to Windows 10 will certainly bring inevitable challenges. You and your employees will be forced to change some of your habits, and certain features you’re used to may become obsolete or have new properties.

If you haven’t already, now is the time to update your business’s software to Windows 10. Doing so sooner rather than later will allow for the fewest number of complications.

If you have questions or concerns about making a smoother transition from Windows 7 to Windows 10, speak to your IT service provider as soon as possible. There are steps you can take to make this transition less of a trial for yourself and your employees.